Skeet shooting is a recreational and competitive activity where participants, using shotguns, attempt to break clay targets mechanically flung into the air from two fixed stations at high speed from a variety of angles

Skeet is one of the three major disciplines of competitive clay pigeon shooting. The others are trap shooting and sporting clays.

For the American version of the game, the clay discs are 4 5⁄16 inches (109.54 mm) in diameter, 1 1⁄8 inches (28.58 mm) thick and fly a distance of 62 yards (57 m).

Charles Davis and William Harnden Foster of Andover, Massachusetts invented skeet shooting. In 1920 Davis, an avid grouse hunter, and Foster, an avid hunter, painter, illustrator and author of “New England Grouse Hunting”, developed a game which was informally called “Shooting around the clock”.

The original course took the form of a circle with a radius of 25 yards with its circumference marked off like the face of a clock and a trap set at the 12-o’clock position. The practice of shooting from all directions had to cease, however, when a chicken farm started next door. The game evolved to its current setup by 1923 when one of the shooters, William Harnden Foster, solved the problem by placing a second trap at the 6-o’clock position and cutting the course in half. Foster quickly noticed the appeal of this kind of competition shooting and set out to make it a national sport.